Curriculum Suggestions by Grade Level*

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Preschool– appropriate for children to begin at age 3–6
Pre-reading: My ABC Bible Verses: Hiding God’s Word in Little Hearts by Susan Hunt
Christian Liberty Nature Reader K by Florence M. Lindstrom
Pre-writing: Fine Motor Fun by Sherrill B. Flora
Preschool Concepts: Use available preschool literature to teach foundational concepts such as colors, counting, opposites, size, directions, and days of the week. Among the many available, Eric Carle’s books, such as The Very Hungry Caterpillar, are helpful.

Kindergarten – appropriate for children to begin at age 4–7
Pre-reading: All About Reading Pre-reading
Pre-writing: Fine Motor Fun by Sherrill B. Flora
Math: Math-U-See Primer*
And/or Math manipulatives, activities, and games:
Pattern blocks and activity cards
Buttons to classify, sort, and string
Math-U-See blocks
Card games: Go Fish, Old Maid, Uno, Playing cards
Board Games: Candyland, Chutes and Ladders
One hundred chart and activities
*Math-U-See’s Primer requires a child to be able to write his numbers. It can be skipped if you do not want to use it. Purchasing a curriculum can lead to pressuring a child to “complete pages” and displace many superior real-life activities in which a kindergartener should engage.

First Grade – appropriate for children to begin at age 5–8
Reading: All About Reading Levels 1–2
Penmanship: A Reason for Handwriting K
Use for the first half of the year to learn proper letter formation. The Teacher’s Manual includes many helpful ideas and is for the K to 6 program.
Spelling: All About Spelling Level 1 (beginning week 13)
Begin mid-year after AAR 1 is well underway
Math: Math-U-See Alpha

Second Grade – appropriate for children to begin at age 6–9
Reading: All About Reading Levels 3–4*
*Available by the end of 2014
Spelling: All About Spelling Levels 2–3
Math: Math-U-See Beta

Third Grade – appropriate for children to begin at age 7–10
Reading: All About Reading Level 5*
*When available
Spelling: All About Spelling Levels 4–5
Writing: Understanding Writing
Understanding Writing is a single resource that includes all levels, first through twelfth grade
Math: Math-U-See Gamma

Fourth Grade – appropriate for children to begin at age 8–11
Reading: Individualized reading list
Penmanship: A Reason for Writing T
Transition from manuscript to cursive
Spelling: All About Spelling Levels 6–7
Writing: Understanding Writing Level 4
Math: Math-U-See Delta

Fifth Grade – appropriate for children to begin at age 9–12
Reading: Individualized reading list
Language: God’s Gift of Language A
SWriting: Understanding Writing Level 5
Math: Math-U-See Epsilon

Sixth Grade – appropriate for children to begin at age 10–13
Reading: Individualized reading list
Language: God’s Gift of Language B
Writing: Understanding Writing Level 6
Math: Math-U-See Zeta

[This is the highest grade level for which Organic Homeschooling provides appropriate content]

Seventh Grade – appropriate for children to begin at age 11–14
Reading: Individualized reading list
Language: God’s Gift of Language C
Writing: Understanding Writing Level 7–8
Math: Math-U-See Zeta (complete or catch up) or Stewardship

Eighth Grade – appropriate for children to begin at age 12–15
Reading: Individualized reading list
Writing: Understanding Writing Level 7–8
Math: Math-U-See Zeta (complete or catch up) or Stewardship or Pre-algebra

Ninth Grade – appropriate for children to begin at age 13–16
Reading: Individualized reading list
Writing: Understanding Writing Level 9–12
Math: Math-U-See Pre-algebra or Algebra 1 (35 lessons)

Tenth Grade – appropriate for children to begin at age 14–17
Reading: Individualized reading list
Writing: Understanding Writing Level 9–12
Math: Math-U-See Algebra 1 or Geometry

*We use the term Grade Level very loosely. A grade-level designation is often assigned to a curriculum to denote a particular skill level, not an specific age. Often mainstream Christian curriculum publishers have already accelerated the content of the curriculum by a full grade level. (Ex. They place what was understood to be “first grade” reading concepts into the Kindergarten curriculum.) You will notice that we use A Beka’s God’s Gift of Language A, B, and C a grade level “behind” where you find them in their catalog.
Testing often drives curriculum decisions as we see in the area of mathematics. When I was in school, pre-algebra was taken by most students (other than math- and science-oriented students) in ninth grade. The practice of taking the (pre) SAT or ACT which include geometry concepts between the sophomore and junior years drove the decision to move pre-algebra back a year into eighth grade. Unfortunately, this has had disastrous results for many math-a-phobic students who are not ready at age fourteen for the analytical thinking needed in algebra.
Because many of our children have been “late bloomers,” children who experience learning delays particularly in reading and writing skills, we suggest a much broader range of ages for each grade level. We have seen that once these children master necessary skills, they usually accelerate in the deficient areas to “catch up” to a more average age/grade level. If that is not the case, we are content to allow them more years in which to complete their studies.

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